Articles

    Roundtable on Pedagogy: Jules Prown, “Reflections on Teaching American Art History”

    Jules D. Prown, “Reflections on Teaching Art History” Prown’s Students Reflect on Prown: Bryan J. Wolf Margaretta M. Lovell Glenn Adamson Stories from the Front Lines: Jessica L. Horton Kevin R. Muller Sarah Anne Carter Sarah Beetham Jason D. LaFountain Jules Prown’s approach to making and teaching art history is among the most well documented …

    The Progress of the Century

    Art and Invention in the United States

    Ellery E. Foutch, Middlebury College Hélène Valance, Université de Franche-Comté Elizabeth Bacon Eager “Creative Combustion: Image, Imagination and the Work of Robert Fulton” Laura Turner Igoe “Capturing ‘Jove’s Autograph’: Late Nineteenth-Century Lightning Photography and Electrical Agency” Cary Levine & Philip Glahn: “Interrogating Invention: Electronic Café and the Politics of Technology” This collection of essays features research …

    Kara Walker’s About the title: The Ghostly Presence of Transgenerational Trauma as a “Connective Tissue” Between the Past and Present

    Vivien Green Fryd Vanderbilt University Kara Walker, the renowned and controversial African American artist, was the subject of a major survey exhibition, Kara Walker: My Complement, My Enemy, My Oppressor, My Love, which was organized by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and was presented there from February 17, 2007 through May 11, 2008; the …

Bully Pulpit

Talk Back: Letters to the Editor

We received some stirring, thoughtful letters in response to last issue’s Bully Pulpit, “Whither Connoisseurship?” Janet Berlo’s letter amounts to a defense of connoisseurship, which she embraces as a valuable tool for developing scholarship on extra-canonical artists and objects. Emerita faculty and graduates of CUNY’s Program in Art History met to discuss the controversy at …

Research Notes

Editors’ Letter

  Dear Colleagues, This is the debut of Research Notes and our first outing as editors. We are gratified by the initial response and going forward we want to add a few words of advice for future submissions. The tone and format for Research Notes are different from a learned essay or a review. Instead …

Fata Morgana: Jean-André Castaigne, the American Indian, and American Artistic Aspirations in France

Emily C. Burns Auburn University   When I was working on my dissertation on constructions of American cultural identities in fin-de-siècle Paris at Washington University in St. Louis in about 2009, I stumbled upon a five hundred page English-language novel published in 1904 by a French artist. Entitled Fata Morgana: A Romance of Art Student …

Exanimate Subjects: Taxidermy in the Artist’s Studio

Corey Piper University of Virginia In the course of researching my dissertation “Animal Pursuits: Hunting and the Visual Arts in Nineteenth-Century America,” I have often had occasion to consider (and sometimes lament) the unequal relationships between humans and animals that are frequently pictured in art. I have found taxidermy to be a potent material embodiment …