Articles

    The Thiele Family Monument: Vision of a Heavenly Future

    Annette Stott, Professor, School of Art and Art History, University of Denver For over one hundred years a granite lady-angel has stood beside a life-size seated granite businessman while gazing at a carved cherub below (fig. 1). For a century passers-by have pondered this unusual family, immortalized in stone on a Wisconsin cemetery plot. What relation do …






    Marmorean Ballplayer: Sheriff John McNamee of Brooklyn and His Sculptural Career in Florence

    Paul H. D. Kaplan, Professor of Art History, State University of New York, Purchase   Brooklyn and baseball have a long-standing and intimate connection. The brash new city and the sport both grew exponentially in the middle of the nineteenth century. Brooklyn became one of the chief centers of the “national pastime,” and this strong …






    State of the Field: American Sculpture

    In this suite of short essays, three specialists in the history of American sculpture consider the history of its formation and the direction of its future course. Roberta K. Tarbell, “Fifty Years of the History of American Sculpture” Elise Madeleine Ciregna, “Cemeteries and Ideal Sculpture” Jennifer Wingate, “Sculpture and Lived Space” Image: S.J. Addis, Carving …






Research Notes

Looking through the Skiascope: Benjamin Gilman and the Invention of the Modern Museum Gallery

Steven Lubar, Department of American Studies, Brown University   Late last summer, I visited the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Museum equipped with an odd device, a skiascope. I wanted to see art the way that Benjamin Ives Gilman (1852–1933) had seen it when he invented the device a century earlier. Gilman was a …






“It’s in My Mind”: William Merritt Chase and the Imagination

James Glisson, The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Garden In some respects, the research methods I use as a curator are the inverse of those of a  graduate student writing a dissertation. While in the past I skipped over works of art that did not fit into my narrative and sought out the best …






A Portrait of Samuel Finley Attributed to John Hesselius

Megan Holloway Fort, Independent Art Historian In 2016, the Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA) undertook a major research initiative focusing on their collection of American paintings and sculpture to 1945. The project was directed by Kimberly Orcutt, who was then serving as Mellon Curator at Large at the IMA and who hired me to work …